March Madness Circa 2018 – #HRCarnival

Brackets? Meh. A few years ago I participated in a March Madness pool with not much interest in basketball and nary a clue about college hoops. It was a travesty of epic proportion and, as I recall, I ended up in last place.

Based upon the enthusiasm of others though, I must be missing something. John Hudson likes this time of year; he wrote about “March Madness in the Workplace” just a few weeks ago. Tim Sackett recently offered up “3 Ways Employers Should Be Encouraging March Madness!”

Bet then, much to the consternation of HR killjoys professionals everywhere, Fortune Magazine let us know that “The Average Worker Will Spend Six Hours Watching March Madness at Work.”

Huh.

So let me offer up a much more productive way to waste spend time at work (while secretly streaming the games) — reading of some HR blogs!

Ladies and gentlemen, I present the sweet, elite submissions from the far corners of the HR blogging world for March….

 

Fast Break

Laurie Ruettimann – Online Learning Series: How to Be Better in Human Resources

Mary Faulkner – When tech and HR combine: What I saw at #UltiConnect

Tamara Rasberry – Looking for a Job – The Full-Time Job from Hell

Judith Lindenberger – 5 Workplace Habits of Successful HR Professionals

Emily Chardac – You’re Already a Leader

 

One on One

Sharlyn Lauby – How to Find Budget Dollars for Employee Recognition

Julie Winkle Giulioni – Attenuating Attrition: How Leaders Can Create a Sticky Situation

Prassad Kurian – The OD Quest: Part 6 – In the wonderland of HR Business Partners!

Yvonne LaRose – Because of Their Endurance, We Can

Helo Tamme – Elderly people, your key to happier employees

 

Rebound

Jennifer Juo –  Is Workplace Distraction Hurting Your Bottom Line?

Jesse Lynn Stoner – Manage Polarities . . . or Step off the Seesaw

Cecilia Clark – 2 Questions to Ask to Increase Motivation

Mark Fogel – It’s Nice to Be a Best Place to Work, But Most Recruiters Toil for the Other 90%

Keith Enochs – Context is King

 

Zone Defense

Wally Bock –  Personal Development: Secrets of Getting Better at Almost Anything

Mark Stelzner – 6 Consumer Trends HR Can’t Ignore

Mark Miller – Tell the Story

Sabrina Baker – Dealing with the Reactionary Leader

Anne Tomkinson – When You’re the Disengaged Employee

 

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Want to get in on the monthly Carnival of HR blogging action? Send me an email at carnivalofhr@gmail.com and make sure to like our Facebook page and follow @CarnivalofHR on Twitter. 

 

HR Meme action courtesy of Nexxt 

Your HYPER-Local Workplace Culture

micro cultureAmy and Becky have adjoining cubicles in your Midwest Region Customer Care Service Center. They’ve sat within 10 feet of each other since 2002 and together have survived 2 CEOs, 3 Department Directors and 6 Supervisors. Amy took care of Becky’s dog when she and her husband Jeff went to that all-inclusive resort in Cancun for their 10th wedding anniversary. Becky helped Amy’s mom throw a surprise birthday party at Applebee’s when Amy turned 40.

Your Midwest Region Customer Care Service Center is located in Glendale, WI (just a bit north of Milwaukee; lovely suburb) and reports in to the Customer Care HQ located in downtown Chicago which, in turn, feeds up, (through various Regional Directors, VPs and a few SVPs), to the corporate office located in Atlanta on Peachtree Street. Well…one of the Peachtree Streets.

There are 327 FTEs toiling away (Monday thru Saturday; 7A-7P; 6 holidays) at the Midwest Region Customer Care Service Center in Glendale, WI. When it’s baseball season they have a company tailgate at a Brewers’ game. During football season, everyone wears Packer gear on casual Fridays. And when you need a custard fix? Jason on the New Accounts team is your go-to-guy for a Kopp’s run at lunch time.

No one at the Midwest Region Customer Care Service Center cares too much for the folks from Customer Care HQ in Chicago. (”Damn FIBs” as Jason likes to call them).

And those Corporate people from Atlanta? Seriously? WTF is up with them? Who can understand what they say?  Why are they so….southern? Did you know they served grits for breakfast when everyone went down for training?

One company.

Same mission, vision and values.  Same corporate web site and, of course, the same corporate career page with the same branding, videos, stories and “EVP.”

Yet each of these teams and locations has a distinct, specific and unique micro-culture. Heck…Amy and Becky have a vastly different culture than Jason and he’s just located on a different floor of the building in Glendale, WI.

And the three of them are most assuredly not having the same cultural experience that Rebecca and Traci are having down at the Atlanta corporate office.

Yet, as happens in organizations the world-over, when a rising star arrives via their promotional travels at a new location (requisite company newsletter blurb: “Meet Brandon Smith, our new VP of Special Projects! Brandon has transferred from the Akron, OH office!”), there’s tension and friction as s/he struggles to determine what, exactly, seems to be “off” about the culture.

There are different foods and rituals and customs. The Boston office is so ‘formal’ while everyone in the Hattiesburg, MS office is a bit too chummy and familiar with each other. (They call each other “sweetie!” Can you imagine?)

But guess what? Amy and Becky, in their micro-culture comprised of 10 cubicles in Glendale, WI, are not ‘wrong.’

They’re simply living the culture in a different way.

HYPER localized.

 

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image courtesy of Odyssey

I Hate Twitter’s 280-Character Limit

At the risk of sounding like the crabby old neighbor lady, waving an upraised fist and shouting “get off my lawn,” let me just say that I despise Twitter’s 280-character limit.

With a passion.

I’ve been hanging on Twitter since 2008, have participated in hundreds of organized chats, been known to tweet along at many a conference or event (one of my annual faves – #rexcomus – just happened), and have relied on the flow of my Twitter stream for both breaking news and levity.

But I am getting exhausted.

I jumped into a chat yesterday and quickly hopped off; I just could not even make the attempt to read the volumes of words flowing down the screen. There were WALLS of text as participants pontificated and wrote lengthy paragraphs when a simple idea or answer would have sufficed.

The fun of a Twitter chat, for me, has always been the fast-pace with quick-hitting (sometime edgy) comments; the platform was designed for rapid-fire banter and discussion.

Not anymore.

When Twitter expanded the available real estate it simply led to more rambling. Gone are the days of users relying on brevity with the need to be succinct, clear and concise.

If you want to be verbose do it on Facebook.

Or LinkedIn; I don’t read much over there anymore either.