I’ve recently found myself diving into multiple conversations, online and off, about “belonging” at work. I’ve been reading articles and news stories about the topic, veered off course in a twitter chat about Diversity & Inclusion yesterday, and have spent a bit of time gauging the climate at my own workplace by observing, asking questions and reviewing some of the norms embedded in our workplace DNA.

Here on the home front I’ve been looking at things like (1) do we let employees express their thoughts and opinions? (2) how are we recognizing people for their accomplishments? (3) do individuals feel valued – not just for their job performance but do they feel valued as unique contributors? (4) are we allowing people to use their special skills and talents in ways that make them “come alive” but also bring a positive impact to the business?

Then last night I read this article – Nearly half of LGBTQ Americans haven’t come out at work – and it’s pretty heartbreaking. In the survey cited in the article, 46% of LGBTQ workers say they are closeted at work and 31`% of LGBTQ workers say they have felt unhappy or depressed at work.  Per the survey, the top reason LGBTQ workers don’t report negative comments they hear about LGBTQ people to a supervisor or human resources is the belief that nothing would be done about it and they don’t want to hurt their relationships with coworkers.” (The full report, A Workplace Divided: Understanding the Climate for LGBTQ Workers Nationwide, can be found here.) 

I also, recently, had the chance to do an episode of WorkHuman Radio with my friends at Globoforce (you can find the link to the show and my related musings here). During the radio chat we talked about operating from a core belief that all people (employees) are entering your company with an innate desire to do their best work. Yet, in our organizational zeal to “win,” I find that we often set up so many roadblocks and obstacles that we demoralize and un-empower those same folks we say we want to “include.” I think there can be a shift though if we (1) Promote values of confidence, freedom, and trust in order to provide a safe environment for employees to learn, create, and collaborate (2) create a workplace that recognizes each employee’s unique contribution, even when their personalities or styles may be a bit quirky.

Yes; “belonging” at work has been consuming my mind. This post is pretty much just me thinking aloud because I’m continuously planning the next steps of the journey. It’s a trip we need to take.

People are longing to belong.

 

Longing to Belong
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